Lunacon 2013

I wasn’t feeling well. I probably shouldn’t have gone. But was I feeling a powerful case of cabin fever, and it was a chance to get another interview for the biography. So I went to Lunacon. this past Saturday.

I’m glad I did, though I paid for it the next day. To my pleasant surprise, it was better for me than last year. I interviewed Leslie Fish (though I forgot to ask her how good a singer Isaac really was); later I attended a filk sing for the first time in over 20 years.

I also did my usual share of gaming: Do Move Say (a great game for a large group of kids or kids-at-heart); Chez Geek (I was the second-best slacker); Munchkin Zombies.

And, as usual, I spent too much money on stuff.

One thing I noticed about this year’s Lunacon is that the costuming was better than it had been in years. I don’t know what brought about the reversal, but this year the costumers really “brought it” in terms of quality of both costumes and ideas. Brava and bravo! I may amend this post later with a few pictures.

Alas, no Werewolves of Miller’s Hollow for me this year. I was feeling poorly at about 9PM, and I knew that if I tried to join that game I’d be there until at least midnight. Maybe next year!

20th-century Doctor Who

Many of my friends are just getting into Doctor Who. This poses a problem for those of them who want become Doctor Who geeks. The newer series, started in 2005, makes frequent references to events and characters in the “classic” Doctor Who series that ran from 1963 to 1989.

Depending on how you count them, there are 157 serials in “20th-century” Doctor Who (it seems so strange to say that). Each serial typically ran between 4-6 half-hour episodes, which works out to roughly 400 hours; it’s actually less than that, since many early serials were destroyed. That’s a lot of time to invest on geekery, especially since some of those serials are pretty awful.

To ease my friends’ entry into Doctor Who geekdom, I offer my list of the key episodes in the saga of the earlier series. Since the quality of the serial often does not correlate with its significance in the development of Doctor Who, I offer a rating of one to four stars for quality, along with the reason why I feel the serial is worth watching.

Continue reading “20th-century Doctor Who”